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Retired Admiral Says He's 'Very Concerned' About Trump Loyalists at Pentagon During Biden Transition

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Retired Navy Admiral Michael Mullen—who was appointed as chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff by former President George W. Bush—said he is "very concerned" about things "Trump loyalists" in the Pentagon could do during the transition from President Donald Trump to President-elect Joe Biden.

Although Biden was declared the winner of the election just over three weeks ago, Trump has refused to concede as he insists without evidence that he lost through widespread voter fraud. Trump's refusal to concede delayed the official transition process, as the General Services Administration (GSA) did not "ascertain" the results of the election and allow it to go forward until last Monday. This decision finally came after a number of prominent Republicans urged for the process to go ahead due to concerns about national security and the COVID-19 pandemic.

"I think I'm actually very concerned about the Trump loyalists who have now gone to work in the Pentagon," Mullen warned during an interview with NBC News' Meet the Press. "I mean, recently, Secretary [of Defense Mark] Esper was fired, and a host of other people left the building. And there are some real Trump loyalists there now in charge and it's pretty difficult to think that over the course of 50 or 60 days you can do something constructive, but you can do something that's really destructive,"

Mullen specifically pointed to possible Trump administration actions toward Iran. "I would be concerned that those issues continue to be raised," he said.

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"One of the things that I learned in the job that I had is you don't want to—you'd like to do all you can to not box in the president, to give any president as many options and as much space as possible," the retired military officer explained. "So, this is obviously the opposite case right now." He pointed out that the transition was completely different between Bush and former President Barack Obama.

Although Mullen was appointed by Bush as the chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2007, he continued to serve in that role for more than two-and-a-half years under Obama.

Newsweek reached out to the Pentagon's press office for comment, but did not receive an immediate response.

Prior to the GSA allowing Biden's transition to formally move forward, a group of more than 100 national security experts who had served in Republican administrations or in Congress warned about the risks of not having a smooth transition in an open letter.

"President Trump's continued efforts to cast doubt on the validity of the election and to interfere in state electoral processes undermine our democracy and risk long-term damage to our institutions," they wrote.

Trump's former national security adviser, John Bolton, has been highly critical of Trump's unfounded claims of widespread fraud. He has also warned that a hampered transition could come with risks to national security.

"Acknowledge the reality that Biden is the president-elect. They may not like it, but the country deserves to give him the preparation he needs," Bolton told NPR on November 13. "A gracious president who kept the country's interest first would acknowledge that."

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Trump Claims FBI And Justice Department May Have Helped Rig Election

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Topline

Despite having finally assented to allowing his administration to cooperate with the transition of power to President-elect Joe Biden, President Trump on Sunday continued to spout baseless voter fraud claims in his first interview since Election Day, including suggesting that the FBI and Department of Justice were involved in rigging the election against him. 

Key Facts

“This is total fraud,” Trump told host Maria Bartiromo during the interview on Fox Business’ “Sunday Morning Futures,” adding: “And how the FBI and Department of Justice—I don’t know—maybe they’re involved, but how people are getting away with this stuff—it’s unbelievable.” 

The president offered no evidence to back up this claim, and then went on to complain at length about how the two agencies had been “missing in action” in investigating his voter fraud claims. 

PROMOTED

The DOJ and FBI did not immediately respond to requests for comment from Forbes.

Key Background

The heads of both the FBI and DOJ were picked by President Trump. FBI Director Christopher Wray was appointed by the president in 2017, while Attorney General William Barr was nominated in late 2018. Barr has been criticized for actions that have been perceived as overly partisan toward the president, including recently clearing the DOJ to investigate voting irregularities before the results are certified, a reversal of longstanding guidance to avoid the appearance of federal intervention in elections that prompted the head of the department’s Election Crimes Branch Richard Pilger to step down from his position in protest. 

Crucial Quote 

Almost all of the dozens of lawsuits filed by the Trump campaign in battleground states have been dismissed by judges—including GOP appointees. However, on Sunday morning, Trump claimed: “We’re trying to put the evidence in and the judges won’t allow us to do it.” 

Further Reading 

“Trump And GSA Authorize Biden To Begin Presidential Transition” (Forbes)

“DOJ Prosecutors Say Barr’s Authorization Of Voter Fraud Probes Is ‘Not Based In Fact’” (Forbes)

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Opinion | Trump Looms Large Now, but Maybe Not Forever

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President Trump’s critics warn that history will look unkindly on his effort to overturn a democratic election. This forecast, while understandable, may be wrong. History rarely looks on one-term presidents at all.

For the last four years I’ve covered his administration as a journalist while also researching and writing books about 19th-century American history. This made it natural to try assessing him from a distance, as future historians might peer at him. Someday the clamor of his tenure will fade, leaving behind a few essential facts, the first of which is his single term.

Few presidents who served four years or less find an enduring place in the popular imagination. One term is not long to influence a country so large and dynamic — and a president’s failure to win a second term can be a sign that he didn’t. If you are not from Indiana, you may not know my state produced Benjamin Harrison, a one-term president who was different from President William Henry Harrison, who died after one month in office. Few people visit the statue of James Buchanan in a lonely corner of a Washington park, and in my life I have met just one enthusiast for Chester A. Arthur.

One-term presidents who escape obscurity often did something beyond the presidency — like John Adams, one of the nation’s founders, or Jimmy Carter, whose much-admired post-presidency has lasted 10 times as long as his term. John F. Kennedy’s legacy rests, in part, on legislative achievements that passed after his assassination. Others are known for their failures while in office: Warren G. Harding for a corruption scandal, Herbert Hoover for economic calamity, Andrew Johnson for being impeached.

We can’t be sure what history will make of Mr. Trump, whose term featured scandal, impeachment and calamity, as well as a pandemic. His story may not be over; he remains at the head of a powerful movement, and reportedly talks of running in 2024. But to judge by information available today, he has a relatively narrow role in the American story: as the reaction to a game-changing president — Barack Obama.

Something like this is true of many presidents. A relative handful enact lasting change, while others respond to them. The ones who left a mark include Andrew Jackson, Mr. Trump’s favorite, who served two terms, from 1829 to 1837. Jackson founded the Democratic Party, reinforced slavery, pursued populist economic policies, and faced down a near-rebellion over states’ rights. When he exceeded his power to achieve his goals, critics called him King Andrew.

Jackson was followed by eight presidents who served in his shadow, two of whom died in office and none of whom went on to a second term. History does not linger long on most of them; they were subordinate characters, mostly shaped by Jackson’s agenda — either advancing or resisting it.

In the same way, Mr. Trump’s place in history may be overshadowed by Mr. Obama’s. Elected in 2008, Mr. Obama seemed to personify America’s growing diversity as a multiracial republic. His campaign motivated new voters, and he talked at first of transcending old political divisions. He said he wanted Americans to regain trust in institutions battered by 9/11, the war in Iraq and the financial crisis. He raised taxes on the wealthiest Americans, signed the Affordable Care Act, tried to break an impasse over immigration and approved a nuclear agreement to ease a long-running conflict with Iran.

He also did not manage to transcend the old divisions. Facing unrelenting opposition from Republicans in Congress, he enraged them by using executive authority to govern around them. Numerous Republicans claimed Mr. Obama had acted like a king.

The Obama presidency paved the way for Mr. Trump. He rose by relentlessly attacking Mr. Obama, promoting the racist conspiracy theory about his birthplace and falsely claiming that he favored open borders. Mr. Trump told voters in 2016 that he was their “last chance” to win before they were overwhelmed by immigration and globalism.

It is astonishing to recall how much Mr. Trump devoted his term to re-fighting the battles of the Obama years. Using executive authority as Mr. Obama had, he rolled back housing and environmental regulations, reversed transgender rights in the military, and branded antiracism programs as racist.

But on many issues he only partly succeeded. He withdrew the United States from the Iran nuclear agreement, but other nations did their best to maintain it. He abandoned Mr. Obama’s strategy toward China, but he struggled to make his own strategy work. He damaged the Affordable Care Act but never managed to repeal it, even when his party controlled Congress.

It was revealing that he publicly supported the most popular benefits of the health insurance law that he said he despised, such as protections for pre-existing conditions. His predecessor defined what health insurance should cover, and Mr. Trump accepted the definition.

Mr. Trump withdrew from the Paris climate accord, but his successor plans to rejoin it. Mr. Trump ended Mr. Obama’s program giving legal status to some undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children, but the Supreme Court restored it, finding Mr. Trump’s action “arbitrary and capricious.” Though Mr. Trump took other actions to limit immigration, the most permanent symbol of his policy may be an unfinished wall in the desert. He neither erased all of President Obama’s accomplishments nor completed his own.

President Trump still has a legacy. He attracted a vast and loyal following. The tax cuts he approved could last for years, while the three conservative justices he appointed are likely to remain on the Supreme Court for decades. His obsessive use of social media made him unlike any president before him, as did his open disregard of barriers between his public duties and personal business. He spoke well of authoritarian rulers, and accelerated the use of disinformation.

The epic conflicts he generated seem like perfect material for future history classes. It is easy to imagine a high school history book recounting the monthslong court fight over his effort to ban Muslims from entering the United States, followed by discussion on religious freedom and the Constitution.

But in those same textbooks, President Trump may be a minor player in the larger story of a democracy grappling with demands for a more equal society — an era marked by the election of Mr. Obama, the first Black president.

And Mr. Trump’s tenure already has a fitting bookend: On Jan. 20, he will be replaced by Mr. Obama’s vice president.

Steve Inskeep is a co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition and Up First, and the author of “Jacksonland” and “Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Fremont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War.”

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

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9:45 AM 11/29/2020 – Tweets by ‎@mikenov: Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York | My News Links - mynewslinks.com

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9:45 AM 11/29/2020 - Tweets by ‎@mikenov: Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York

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 9:45 AM 11/29/2020 - Tweets by ‎@mikenov: Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York

Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York

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  1. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/politics/cuomo-this-is-the-year-marijuana-finally-gets-legalized-in-new-york/2705462/?_osource=db_npd_nbc_wnbc_twt_shr 

    Cuomo: This Is the Year Marijuana Finally Gets Legalized in New York

    After years of near-misses, Gov. Andrew Cuomo expects New York legislators to finally legalize marijuana in 2021, getting over past opposition and division for one simple reason – the state needs the...

    <a href="http://nbcnewyork.com" rel="nofollow">nbcnewyork.com</a>
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  2. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    ‘Americans are voting to legalize weed. It’s unlikely the next Congress will do the same.’ on #SoundCloud #np https://soundcloud.com/mike-nova-3/americans-are-voting-to-legalize-weed-its-unlikely-the-next-congress-will-do-the-same 

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  3.  
     Michael Novakhov Retweeted
    Meet the Press
     
    @MeetThePress

    COMING UP ON #MTP: As Covid cases, hospitalizations and deaths rise, a look at the impact on health care workers. Dr. Anthony Fauci joins. Plus, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen. #IfItsSunday

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  4. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    Current and Selected News Articles - http://newsandtimes.net  https://newsandtimes.net/the-news-and-times-2/selected-news-articles/  Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty: Dozens Reported Detained In Belarus At Anti-Lukashenka Marches
    Sun, 29 Nov 2020 13:42:50 +0000
    Authorities in Belarus have detained dozens of protesters amid...

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     Michael Novakhov Retweeted
    Daily Mail Online
     
    @MailOnline

    Boko Haram massacre kills at least 43: Islamist militants behead and slit the throats of Nigerian rice farmers https://trib.al/V4pObWk 

    Boko Haram behead and slit throats of 43 Nigerian farmers

    The workers had been tied up and had their throats slit in the horrific attack in Borno state, with up to 70 people feared dead.

    dailymail.co.uk
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  6. Michael Novakhov@mikenov

    Current and Selected News Articles - http://newsandtimes.net  https://newsandtimes.net/the-news-and-times-2/selected-news-articles/  Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty: Dozens Reported Detained In Belarus At Anti-Lukashenka Marches
    Sun, 29 Nov 2020 13:42:50 +0000
    Authorities in Belarus have detained dozens of protesters amid...

    Current and Selected News Articles - <a href="http://newsandtimes.net" rel="nofollow">newsandtimes.net</a> | The News And T

    The News And Times Blogs Network - <a href="http://newsandtimes.net" rel="nofollow">newsandtimes.net</a> The News And Times Blogs Network - <a href="http://newsandtimes.net" rel="nofollow">newsandtimes.net</a> | Audio Posts in English Current and Selected News Articles - <a href="http://newsandtimes.net" rel="nofollow">newsandtimes.net</a> Current News on R

    <a href="http://newsandtimes.net" rel="nofollow">newsandtimes.net</a>
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  7.  
     Michael Novakhov Retweeted
    Cato Institute
     
    @CatoInstitute

    Biden’s trade policy is likely to be a component of a broader geopolitical strategy. https://j.mp/2IiQFUn  #Cato2020 #CatoTrade

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     Michael Novakhov Retweeted
    Middle East Monitor
     
    @MiddleEastMnt

    IAEA: Iran’s top nuclear scientist stayed in shadows but his work was uncovered https://www.middleeastmonitor.com/20201129-iaea-irans-top-nuclear-scientist-stayed-in-shadows-but-his-work-was-uncovered/ 

    IAEA: Iran's top nuclear scientist stayed in shadows but his work was uncovered

    Iranian scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, who was killed on Friday, led a life of such secrecy that even his age was under wraps but much about the clandestine nuclear weapons programme he is believed to...

    <a href="http://middleeastmonitor.com" rel="nofollow">middleeastmonitor.com</a>
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